Terminology Language is a beautiful form of communication. There are hundreds of indigenous languages in the Amazon rainforest. Each ethnic group has its own unique lexicon. Each is music to the ears.

Aguarico  The Cofán and other indigenous communities live along the Aguarico River located in northern Ecuador. Literally translated in English, it means rich water river. It is the main river of the Sucumbíos province and at the last part of its course, it reaches the Ecuadorian-Peruvian border. It empties into the Napo River. It has a length of 390 kilometers with the last 50 kilometers of its course extending along the natural border between Ecuador and Peru in the department of Loreto.

Aints
  Means “the people” in Awajún  language.

A’i
  The A’i or Cofán people, are an indigenous people native to the Napo Province in northeast Ecuador and southern Colombia, living between the Guamués River (a tributary of the Putumayo River) and the Aguarico River (a tributary of the Napo River). Their population is now only 2,100 people according to a 2010 survey, down from approximately 15,000 in the mid-16th century; when the Spanish diminished their ancient civilization leaving few archeological remains. They speak the Cofán language or A’ingae, a language of the Chibchan family.

Aishmag
  Man in Awajún language.

A’ingae
  Cofán language.

Ajútap
  In Awajún language, Spirit Power that makes a person invulnerable in battle.

Ama
  Ama was created from the word Amazon, as a diminutive, to name our Ama collection, which is handmade by Asociación Sukû artisans of the Cofán community of Dureno in the Ecuadorian Amazon. Ama also means Love.

Amazon
  The area in Latin America where our work is focused.  It is the most biodiverse ecosystem in the world, responsible for carbon sequestration and regulating global climate. The Amazon basin is over 2,250,000 sq. miles (5,827,500 sq. km). Named for the Amazon River in South America, rising in the Peruvian Andes and flowing east through north Brazil to the Atlantic; is the largest river in the world in volume; navigable for 2,300 miles (3,700 km) with a length over 4,000 miles (6,440 km). Area of basin is over 2,250,000 sq. miles (5,827,500 sq. km).

Apajui
  The Creator in Awajún language.

Asháninka
  The Asháninka are an indigenous people of the Peruvian Amazon rainforest with a population of 45,000. They are the second largest indigenous group in Perú after the Quechua people. Asháninka means “our fellows” or “our kin-folk.” Their ancestral lands are in the forests of Junín, Pasco, Huánuco and part of Ucayali, stretching across the easternmost Peruvian Amazon with only a few hundred living in the state of Acre in Brazil.

Awajún
  Also called Aguaruna people in Spanish, are an indigenous people of the Peruvian Amazon that live along the Marañón River and several tributaries near the Ecuadorian border. Historically, they lived primarily on the banks of the Marañón River, a tributary of the Amazon in northern Peru near the border with Ecuador. Currently, they possess titled community lands in four of Peru’s regions: Amazonas, Cajamarca, Loreto, and San Martin. According to Peru’s 1993 Census the Awajún numbered approximately 45,000. World Census data for 2000 lists their population at just over 38,000. More on the Awajún on our Awajún page.

Ayú
  Hello in the Awajún language.

Baki
  Name for the Baki necklace in our collection. The name comes from the word “Bakichik” in the Awajún language, which means “One”.

Bakichik
  The number “One” in Awajún language.

Beaded
  Strung or decorated with beads, as in a beaded necklace or beaded bag.

Bio-Jewelry
  Jewelry made from plant based materials.

Bikut
  Father Shaman in Awajún language.

Boho Chic
  A fashion style drawing from eclectic influences from around the world, adopted initially by hippies in the 60’s. Boho is the abbreviation for Bohemian, a term that originated from the actual Kingdom of Bohemia in the now called Czech Republic. A Bohemian is a person from Bohemia and was also later used as a name for Gypsy and Roma People.  It is also used to describe an unconventional person involved in the arts. Chic came from the French and has come to signify stylish or elegant.

Ccovu
  Ccovu means Moon in Cofán A’ingae language.

Chambira
  A native palm of the Amazon Rainforest, which has edible endosperm and fruit. It is of commercial value for its excellent fibers that are used for bags, hammocks, ropes, string instruments, jewelry and many crafts. It is also used as a medicinal plant.

Chichao
  Name in Awajún language of a large round and black seed.

Chiga
  Sun in Cofán A’ingae language.

Cofán
  The Cofán or A’i people, are an indigenous people native to the Napo Province in northeast Ecuador and southern Colombia, living between the Guamués River (a tributary of the Putumayo River) and the Aguarico River (a tributary of the Napo River). Their population is now only 2,100 people according to a 2010 survey, down from approximately 15,000 in the mid-16th century; when the Spanish diminished their ancient civilization leaving few archeological remains. They speak the Cofán language or A’ingae, a language of the Chibchan family.

Cushma
  Also spelled Kushma is a Quechua word. It is a long tunic-like robe that is worn all the way to the ankles. The Cushma is spun, handwoven and dyed by women weavers. They are made of organic rainforest cotton that has been grow for millennia in small forest gardens by the Ashaninka in the Peruvian Amazon, and dyed with rainforest plant dyes. The Cushma has been worn for over three thousand years by the Ashaninka, now reserved for important occasions as a status symbol.

Eco Fashion
See Eco Fashion page.

Eco Jewelry
  See Eco Jewelry page.

Enkepa
  A long Awajún breast plate necklace made with seeds in a chainmail pattern.

Etsa
  Etsa means Sun in Awajún. It is also the name of one of our collections and their respective jewelry styles, i.e. Etsa Beaded Necklace, etc.

Etse
  In the Awajún language, etse is a red and black seed, also called “huayruro” in Spanish. The huayruro seed is a good luck seed. The red and black colors symbolize good fortune and abundance, as well as balance. The seeds are said to protect from negativity and bring happiness. In the Peruvian Amazon, newlyweds and newborns often receive huayruro seeds as gifts for a happy and prosperous life. Huayruro seeds are known to be poisonous if ingested. We recommend that any jewelry with huayruro seeds be kept away from children.

Gypset
  A compound word derived from Gypsy and Jet Set. Gypsetters are artists, designers, surfers and bon vivants who live semi-nomadic bohemian lifestyles and live, play and work around the world. Gypsies or Roma people are a nomadic culture that originated in India and have spread throughout the world. Jet setters are an international social group made up of affluent people who travel to fashionable destinations around the world.

Handmade
  An item made by hand, not by machine. Handmade items are of higher quality and value.

Handwoven
  Woven by hand or in a hand operated loom for textiles. Handwoven items are of higher quality and value.

Iinia
  Means “ourselves” in Awajún language.

Indigenous
  Originating, born or occurring naturally in a particular place. As in a native or indigenous Amazon community. Also native, aboriginal, native-born.

Ipáamamu
  In Awajún language, a traditional institution of mutual aid and collaboration.

Ipaksumat
  The number “Four” in the Awajún language.

Jimaj
The number “Two” in the Awajún language.

Kampatum
  The number “Three” in the Awajún language.

Kango
  This word was made up as a diminutive of the word “kangopacho”, the rainforest seeds used in the Kango collection, handmade by Asociación Sukû artisans of Cofán Dureno in the Ecuadorian Amazon.

Kangopacho
  Cofán name for a small round and black rainforest seed used by Amazonian artisans to make seed jewelry, which is used in many of the collections of Amazon eco fashion in our Shop.

Kumpia
  In the Awajún language, very tiny seed in a natural beige color used in beading. This same seed is called “sarandango” in the Cofán language.

Mara
  Used as the name of our Mara collection, as a diminutive of the Marañón River.

Marañón
  The Awajún and other communities live along the Marañon river. The Marañón river rises about 160 km to the northeast of Lima, Peru, flows through a deeply-eroded Andean valley in a northwesterly direction, along the eastern base of the Cordillera of the Andes, as far as 5 degrees 36′ southern latitude; then it makes a great bend to the northeast, and cuts through the inland Andes, until at the Pongo de Manseriche it flows through the plains. After its confluence with Ucayali River, the Marañón is given the name of the Amazon River.

Muun
  Great and Powerful in Awajún language. Also used as the name of the Muun collection.

Nantu
  Moon in Awajún language.

Naya
  The name of the Naya necklace in our collection. Named as a diminutive for the word “Nayainpinmak”, which means “Heaven” in the Awajún language.

Nayainpinmak
  means Heaven in the Awajún language.

Núgkui
  Mother Earth in Awajún language. Also used as the name of the Núgkui collection.

Nuwa
Woman in Awajún language.

Pusheshu
  Woman in Cofán A’ingae language.

Sara
  A diminutive of “sarandango”, used to name of our Sara collection.

Sarandango
  In the Cofán language, a very tiny seed in a natural beige color used in beading. This same seed is called “kumpia” in the Awajún language.

Shigra
   Bag in the Cofán language, usually made with chambira plant fiber and/or seeds .

Tsa’ccu
  Water in Cofán A’ingae language.

Tsandie
  Man in Cofán A’ingae language.

Tsúgki
  Water spirits in Awajún language.

Tuju
  Is the Awajún name for a small round and black rainforest seed used by Amazonian artisans to make seed jewelry. It is also called Kangopacho in Cofán.

Upcycle
  Upcycling is the process of converting waste materials or useless products into new materials or products of better quality or a higher environmental value.

Uweja
  The number “Five” in the Awajún language.

Wanpash
  Bag in the Awajún language, usually made with chambira plant fiber.

Wayampai
  In the Awajún language it is a small long and oval-shaped black seed. The Cofán call this same seed long or oval Kangopacho.

Yáakat
  In Awajún language, a town in the pattern of a nuclear or kin related population without streets, paths or squares. Distributed asymmetrically, usually along a river.

Yanpak
  In the Awajún language, a brown seed that has the appearance of being translucent.

Yawaa
  Dog in the Awajún language.

Yumi
  Water in the Awajún language. Also used as the name of the Yumi collection.

Yusajiak
  Name in Awajún language for an oval-shaped seed of tan, grey or brown color.

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